Candle In The Wind, Elton John - matherton_tempo_map

The first lines of Elton John’s Candle In The Wind, a song that was re-worded by its original lyrical composer Taupin for the memorial service on the day of the funeral of Diana Spencer, as Goodbye England’s Rose, came to mind when Carter became as he lamented, “We’ve said our goodbyes.” It’s funny and it’s sad as a juxtaposition in ideas. To the avid Bold and Beautiful viewer, seeing main characters often four or five times in a week, we get to know at least what their characters are at much closer range than an ethereal memory of Marilyn Monroe or Princess Diana.

American drama on daytime network television
The Bold and the Beautiful
season 34
episode 206

It’s a little bit funny (pun intended) that the goodbyes between Quinn and Carter this week will not withstand their mutual choice to be with each other because beyond physically they bring out the best in the other’s clarity of mind and validation as a person.

I fear that Carter’s “being lost in” the thoughts of Quinn have shaken his rational person status as an attorney. He seems not to even give a thought to the level of conflicts of interest that could suspend his license to practice law indefinitely should the Forrester family find out. To the extent that Eric asked Carter to pursue a divorce immediately, and to the extent Carter has not recused himself from at least telling Eric he is still sleeping with Quinn, counselor Walton is literally sleeping with the enemy. Divorce law is messy enough without having the legal affairs of the entire family of the party you represent in your hands with the ultimate betrayal of being involved with the spouse of the party you are suing in every position in your home office legal branch. Divorce law, corporate law and trusts and estates law expertise, all in Carter, all out there to be lost? Quinn is more powerful than he is, as her jewelry line will never suffer, and his entire legal character and reputation are as fragile as one more accidental phone call.

One can imagine Eric calling Carter to ask him about the status of the divorce and his screen picks up a naked Quinn behind the bigger than life-size portrait Eric asked Carter to destroy.

Imagine, John Lennon - tempo map
John Lennon
Imagine
speed illustration

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In episode 205, we see a man in denial – and that man is Eric Forrester.

As he calls Carter, the call captures Carter’s apartment with a half-naked Carter and a dress behind him. He reasons, as he discusses the ‘No Quinn Contact’ order he has placed upon Carter, that because the dress does not fit Carter it is not his. Sound enough. Then takes the logical leap that he has moved past Quinn. He knows deep down it’s Quinn’s dress and he’s in denial. A benevolent Ridge who is keen enough to notice this, offers a “maybe he’s just broken down and picking up the pieces” excuse for Carter’s work environment, less out of logic and more out of a desire to see his father save face in a situation where Eric is getting massively and cruelly played.

BB-s34e205-family-company-business-summary
BB-s34e205-family-company-business-summary

Meanwhile three other storylines feature “never let this moment end” emotions: Quinn and Carter wanting to save their physical memories, Finn, Steffy and Hayes never wanting the permanent vacation (as Paris put it) to end and Paris coming to Los Angeles, landing a job with the Forrester Creations as Foundation Director, while going from living in a car to a small apartment to a Bel-Air type mansion in less than a year – all three of these things are times in life that most people would like to extend if not hypothetically live in forever.

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Looking at this show is like looking at a bunch of rolling stones.

Multiple sclerosis, heart disease, cancer, being shot at, being poisoned, being run out of a Los Angeles A+ fashion house, losing one’s father as a 12 year old, growing up an orphan, being stabbed are all things that have happened to one of the characters that appears today.

american daytime television drama notes
The Young and the Restless®
s48e206

I always have a check mark for people that have encountered death especially at a savagely young age in an exceptionally cruel way.

Today’s episode 206 in season 48, was too well written to comment on beyond that. This episode showed an exceptional effort by the writers which appeared to bounce off the actors who are veterans and accustomed to theme and variation on change using characters that have been built over four decades.